University of Florida Wins National Concrete Canoe Competition

BY 
June 22, 2015

The University of Florida earned the “America’s Cup of Civil Engineering” today at the 28th annual American Society of Civil Engineers’ (ASCE) National Concrete Canoe Competition (NCCC). After three days of competition against 21 other teams, the University of Florida team and its canoe, Forever Glades, came out on top. “We were completely shocked,” says University of Florida team captain  Danielle Kennedy, upon learning her team took home first. “We didn’t even get top 5 in final product, so I was not expecting this at all.”

Over the course of the school year, 215 teams of civil engineering students logged thousands of hours researching, designing and constructing their unique concrete canoes in a quest for the winning combination of creativity, knowledge and teamwork to advance to the national competition, which took place June 20-22 at Clemson University in Clemson, South Carolina.

22 teams from around the country traveled over 50,000 miles round trip to come to the National Competition, carrying their canoes in trailers. Pictured here is the team from Western Kentucky University. Photo: John Amis/AP Images for ASCE.

22 teams from around the country traveled over 50,000 miles round trip to come to the National Competition, carrying their canoes in trailers. Pictured here is the team from Western Kentucky University. Photo: John Amis/AP Images for ASCE.

“It’s exciting to see the next generation of civil engineers demonstrate such impressive teamwork, leadership, creativity and ingenuity as they embrace this challenge,” said Mark Woodson, P.E., F.ASCE, president-elect of ASCE. “I am grateful to Clemson University for all of their hard work hosting the National Concrete Canoe Competition to help make this event such a success.”

The University of Florida team sponging down their canoe, Forever Glades. The team's theme was conservation of the Everglades. Photo: John Amis/AP Images for ASCE.

The University of Florida team sponging down their canoe, Forever Glades. The team’s theme was conservation of the Everglades. Photo: John Amis/AP Images for ASCE.

The competition consists of both academic and athletic events, and the scores are divided into four components which are each worth 25 percent of the team’s final score. Students write a technical paper detailing the design and construction of their canoe and then give oral presentations about their year-long project. They are also judged on their final product, the canoe, and their accompanying display, which further explains their design process. Finally, they put their canoe to the test in a series of five race events—men’s and women’s slalom/endurance races and men’s, women’s and co-ed sprint races.

The winning team receives a $5,000 scholarship and a trophy. Second place team receives a $2,500 scholarship and a trophy, and the third place team receives a $1,500 scholarship and a trophy.

The top 5 overall winners of the 2015 competition are: University of Florida (first); California Polytechnic State University, San Luis Obispo (second); University of California, Berkeley (third); École de technologie supérieure (fourth); Clemson University (fifth)

See the complete rankings on the Concrete Canoe Final Results page.

Watch highlights from the full weekend of events!

For photos from the big competition, check out ASCE’s Flickr page.

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4 Comments
  • That canoe was special. The gator in the center was a mind-blowing work of art. Congratulations to UF on a tremendous job with the concrete canoe.

  • Go Gators. Chomped their way to first place.

  • Go Cal Poly Mustangs! Second place is pretty decent, and you gotta still be proud of that one. Not to mention, winning the “Innovation Award” is quite an honor. Congrats, and congrats as well to Univ of FL for the win….and yes, bravo to all the competitors.

    Cheers,

    WT
    Cal Poly 2011

  • Congratulations to the winning Team, University of Florida, and bravo to all the competitors.

    Best regards,

    Nives

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