Photo – Something Cool

June 14, 2012

Nuclear Cooling Tower in Winter

Here’s a cool picture to ponder on a hot summer day. Nuclear cooling towers operate year round. In the winter, the crystallizing steam creates huge icicles near the base of the tower. The predecessor firm to my company in Chicago got their big break designing hyperbolic cooling tower structures in the 1960s. They applied the technology to concrete core wall systems for skyscrapers. We occasionally still get some work performing retrofits of the interior structure which is subject to extreme weathering conditions.

6 Comments
  • Cooling Tower is an important equipment in your plant, which optimizes the process and ensures the best production yield. Major industries such as electricity generating, petroleum refining, chemical processing, sugar, air-conditioning and refrigeration, steel and so on use a vast assortment of cooling towers.

  • The type of heat rejection in a cooling tower is termed “evaporative” in that it allows a small portion of the water being cooled to evaporate into a moving air stream to provide significant cooling to the rest of that water stream. The heat from the water stream transferred to the air stream raises the air’s temperature and its relative humidity to 100%, and this air is discharged to the atmosphere.

  • This heat rejection is accomplished through the natural process of evaporation that takes place when air and water is brought into direct contact in the cooling tower. The evaporation is most efficient when the maximum water surface area is exposed to the maximum flow of air in the longest possible period of time.

  • Major industries such as electricity generating, petroleum refining, chemical processing, sugar, air-conditioning and refrigeration, steel and so on use a vast assortment of cooling towers.The primary task of a cooling tower is to cool water by rejecting heat into the atmosphere.

  • This heat rejection is accomplished through the natural process of evaporation that takes place when air and water is brought into direct contact in the cooling tower.

  • The type of heat rejection in a cooling tower is termed “evaporative” in that it allows a small portion of the water being cooled to evaporate into a moving air stream to provide significant cooling to the rest of that water stream.

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