Biggs Honored with The Masonry Society’s 2013 Paul Haller Structural Design Award

BY 
January 22, 2014

David T. Biggs, P.E., S.E, Hon. TMS., F.SEI, F.ACI, Dist. M.ASCE, principal of Troy, New York-headquartered Biggs Consulting Engineering PLLC, was recently awarded the 2013 Paul Haller Structural Design Award from The Masonry Society. The award recognizes design work that enhances the beauty, elegance, and economy of structural masonry projects and the long-term impact masonry structures can have on a community. In addition, Biggs was also named a 2013 Concrete Influencer by Concrete Producer magazine for his work as coordinator of the North American initiative by the masonry industries to develop digital technology for Building Information Modeling for masonry (BIM-M). As principal of Biggs Consulting, Biggs specializes in structural forensic engineering, masonry design, and historic restoration. He is also involved with research projects and provides consulting for the development of new masonry products. A graduate of Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute (RPI), where he earned both bachelor’s and master’s degrees in civil engineering, Biggs also served as an adjunct in the Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering at RPI, where he developed and taught the “Masonry Structures” course. Among the highlights of his distinguished career, Biggs was a member of the FEMA/ASCE Building Performance Assessment Team, which was assigned to investigate the 9/11 World Trade Center disaster, and he was a consultant to the Supreme Council of Antiquities for the Republic of Egypt, where he was part of a 6-member international team providing restoration guidelines for use throughout Egypt. He also served as a consultant to the University of Pennsylvania on the restoration and preservation of Gordion, Turkey, the ancient city of King Midas dating to 750 BC. In 2007 he developed the Hybrid Masonry structural building concept, and has been involved with the development of computer software training and research related to the new system. This led to a $1.3 million project funded by the National Science Foundation to research seismic response of hybrid masonry buildings at the University of Illinois, the University of Hawaii, and Rice University. Much in demand as a lecturer, Biggs has been a visiting lecturer at the Czech Technical University in Prague and the University of Auckland, New Zealand. In 2013, he also became a visiting lecturer for the Iraqi Institute for the Conservation of Antiquities and Heritage through the University of Delaware, Institute for Global Studies. The work includes evaluations of the Citadel in Erbil, Iraq, which is considered the oldest city in existence, dating to 6000 BC. Among his many distinguished honors and awards, Biggs has been the recipient of ASCE’s Daniel W. Mead Prize and the Edmund Friedman Young Engineer Award for Professional Achievement. A past member of ASCE’s Board of Direction, he has also been presented the Engineer of the Year Award from both the New York State Society of Professional Engineers and the New York Association of Consulting Engineers, and was the first to be selected as a Distinguished Graduate of the Department of Civil Engineering from Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute. Past chair of the ASCE’s Publications, Audit, Tellers, and Younger Members Committees, Biggs is currently an active member of ASCE’s Mohawk-Hudson Section and a member of the editorial board for Structure magazine.

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